Welcome to Meade County School Food Service


Historically, the School Lunch Program was founded to help meet the nutritional needs of school children.  The program has grown and now educators recognize it as a vital part of education.  As society continues to see the need to recognize the "total child", the school lunch program becomes increasingly more important.  A child learns to eat a great variety of foods, in many instances being introduced to new foods; he learns social graces which are a part of an educated person's make-up; and the pleasant break in the middle of the day enables the child to return to the classroom refreshed mentally and his body fortified nutritionally; thus making him better able to receive the teacher's instruction.  Studies show that the child who is a behavior problem and also a poor achiever is one who very often has not had an adequate breakfast nor is he eating a well-balanced lunch at school.

Recognizing these values of the school lunch program, it is necessary to employ lunchroom personnel who meet certain requirements.  After all health requirements are established, the worker must have, just as a good teacher must have, a love for children and a pride in their work.

Just as a teacher does not enter the classroom without some preparation and a plan, so the lunchroom must have organization.  Each worker must know what their job is and must be willing to accept direction from the manager, who is the person responsible for the operation of the lunchroom.  These two requirements are necessary for the smooth operation of a quality food service.

Just as a good classroom teacher continues their education in an effort to improve their teaching ability, so it is important for a good lunchroom "teacher" to be ever aware of new foods, new equipment, new recipes and new methods.

When the time comes that the classroom teacher and the lunchroom "teacher" see that they have a common goal -- to prepare a child for the future, both in mind and body -- the children of this and each succeeding generation will be healthier and more valuable to society.

Nutrition & Physical Activity Report 2017-18 Snapshot

Nutrition & Physical Activity Report 2017-18


Healthy Snacks for Classrooms

District Wellness Plan

Student Welfare and Wellness Policy 

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1)     mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture

         Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights

         1400 Independence Avenue, SW

           Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2)     fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3)     email: program.intake@usda.gov.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.